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Brett Anderson had a quick reaction when the baseball and both pieces of a broken bat came sailing at him in the fifth inning.

Get out of the way.

Oakland’s left-hander managed to do that, but left the game in the following inning with a cervical strain, and the Athletics hung on to beat the Cleveland Indians 6-4 on Monday.

Anderson (5-3) allowed one run in 5 1/3 innings, improving to 4-0 with a 0.94 ERA in six starts against the Indians. The 31-year-old left-hander was injured in the fifth inning when he ducked to avoid a ball hit up the middle by Roberto Perez. Anderson also had to watch the bat, which broke when Perez made contact.

Anderson has had arm injuries throughout his career, including being sidelined twice last season.

“Kind of another fluky thing where I only have to deal with when I break a guy’s bat and I don’t know where the barrel is going,” he said.

Anderson finished the inning, then was removed in the sixth with a 3-1 lead and a runner on second. He is dealing with soreness and stiffness, but said he should be fine going forward.

“My range of motion going to the inside part of the plate was limited,” he said. “It was one of those things where I can get out of it when it’s not too bad. I felt that was the right moment.”

Manager Bob Melvin and a team trainer visited the mound in both the fifth and sixth, and Anderson walked to the dugout on the second occasion.

“He’s all right,” Melvin said. “When the bat broke and went back over him, he kind of snapped his neck a little bit so we will see how he is tomorrow. Up to that point he was really good.”

Jurickson Profar, Matt Olson and Matt Chapman homered as Oakland extended its winning streak to four, matching its season high. The A’s have won seven of their last 10 games against the Indians.

Jose Ramirez hit an RBI single in the eighth off Lou Trivino that pulled Cleveland to 4-3, and Blake Treinen retired Carlos Gonzalez on an inning-ending groundout with the bases loaded.

Chapman hit a two-run homer off Tyler Clippard in the ninth. Francisco Lindor had a two-out homer in the bottom half, and Treinen retired Jason Kipnis on a groundout for his eighth save in 10 chances.

Profar and Olson homered off Carlos Carrasco (4-4), who allowed three runs, seven hits and two walks, throwing 100 pitches in five innings.

Profar’s homer in the second was the first run Carrasco allowed in 13 innings.

TRAINER’S ROOM

Athletics: OF Khris Davis was out of the lineup because of a sore left hip, an injury that caused him to miss games from May 9-11. He was out of the lineup Saturday and returned Sunday in Detroit.

Indians: RHP Corey Kluber will have an X-ray on his broken right arm Thursday. He was hit by a line drive May 1. Kluber’s arm has been in a cast, which could be fitted with a removable splint depending on the results of the X-ray.

LOT OF PITCHES

Carrasco was coming off two dominant performances against the Chicago White Sox, but admitted he didn’t have his best stuff Monday. The right-hander knew his high pitch count would lead to a short outing.

“I wanted to go deep in the game so we wouldn’t have to use our bullpen too much,” he said. “I started worrying when I saw like 70 pitches in the third inning.”

HOT CORNER

In addition to hitting a home run, Chapman took a hit away from Kipnis at third with a backhand grab in the first and added a couple of other solid defensive plays.

“You hit it to third, you’re out,” Indians manager Terry Francona said. “That kid’s special.”

STREAK STOPPER

Oakland could have a five-game winning streak, but their contest in Detroit on Sunday was suspended due to rain with the Athletics leading 5-3 going into the bottom of the seventh. The game will resume Sept. 6 before the Tigers play a series in Oakland

UP NEXT

Athletics: RHP Chris Bassitt (2-1 1.93 ERA) has the AL’s third-lowest ERA among pitchers with 30 or more innings. Bassitt is a Toledo native and played at the University of Akron.

Indians: RHP Trevor Bauer (4-2, 3.76 ERA) got a no-decision against Baltimore in his last start, but allowed seven runs — matching a career high — in five innings.

Cheap Authentic Corey Kluber Jersey Wholesale

Indians ace Corey Kluber’s broken right arm isn’t all that’s hurting him.

Less than one week after absorbing the impact of a 102 mph line drive during a start in Miami, Cleveland’s two-time AL Cy Young Award winner said Tuesday he still is coming to grips with his injury.

“You want to be out there with the team,” Kluber said, speaking for the first time since getting hit. “You want to be contributing. When it’s your day to pitch, you want to be able to take the ball every fifth day.”

That won’t happen for a while, but Kluber remains optimistic he’ll be able to return and pitch this season.

“I don’t have a plan not to pitch again,” he said. “Obviously, I don’t have a definitive timeline because it’s all depending on how things heal. But in my mind, I’m not looking at it as season ending.”

Sitting at a small table in a room across the hallway from the Indians’ clubhouse, Kluber occasionally peered at his arm which has been fitted with a soft cast. The 33-year-old will undergo weekly X-rays before doctors will know whether his bone has healed properly and he can avoid surgery.

Until then, Kluber’s biggest challenge is staying positive and optimistic. It’s not so bad now because the Indians are playing at home and his teammates are around to support him.

Soon, though, Kluber will be alone.

“The initial stage where you’re not able to do much, you just kind of have to sit around and be at your body’s mercy,” he said. “That’s probably the most frustrating thing.”

It’s impossible to say with any certainty whether Kluber, who went 20-7 last season, will be on the mound again in 2019. But manager Terry Francona is confident the right-hander will do everything within his power to return to the rotation.

“We know he’s hurting that he’s not pitching,” Francona said. “We also know him well enough that he’s going to do everything in his power to be as good as he can be as quick as he can be. That’s a given.”

Kluber wasn’t pitching at his usual high level before getting hurt, going 2/3 with a 5.80 ERA in seven starts. If there is a silver lining in his injury, it could be that he’ll be able to rest an arm that has logged over 200 innings in each of the past five seasons.

“We don’t want him out. But since he is out, that’s one way to look at it because he has shouldered a huge load the last five years,” Francona said. “Good pitchers do. So that’s one way you can certainly look at it. I think I said that about (Carlos) Carrasco a couple years ago when he pulled his hammy.

“When he came back he was stronger, his tank was so full because he hadn’t thrown a bunch of innings.”

Kluber won’t know if the time away will help until he’s back.

“Generally speaking, I tend to feel better the more I throw, the more we get into the season, so I don’t think that throwing every fifth day for six months has been a problem for me,” he said. “But, I guess we’ll just have to wait and see how that is when we get there. I can’t say one way or the other.”

Kluber’s injury has further taxed Cleveland’s pitching staff, which is also without starter Mike Clevinger. He’s recovering from a back injury and will miss another month.

The Indians were counting on their pitching to carry them to a fourth straight AL Central title. But the club isn’t hitting, either, and Kluber’s injury has presented a new hurdle.

Kluber, though, believes the Indians have enough talent to win.

“Whichever 25 guys are in that room, that’s who you’re going to battle with that day and you have confidence that they’re there for a reason,” he said. “I don’t think that changes based on who is or who isn’t hurt and I think that’s the approach we take every day is we have 25 guys on our roster and trying to utilize those 25 guys the best we can to win that day.”